Fiction: “D is for Deadbeat” by Sue Grafton

d is for deadbeatYet another stop on the train ride towards PRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND ZOMBIES, and finally I can say with confidence, yes, it shall be next. I needed a palate cleanser between New Moon and the Awesome.

Kinsey Millhone is the protagonist of Sue Grafton’s Alphabet series. I’ve read as far as “I” three times, and up to “O” at least once. This is attempt number 4 to get through the entire series without getting distracted.

Don’t get me wrong, this is one of the first mystery series I ever read, and I still adore it. There are just a lot more books in my little tiny room that I want to read. Plus, the majority of the series is still at my parents’s house back in Brunswick.

Anyhoodle. Kinsey operates a private detective agency in Santa Teresa, and this novel’s plot kicks off when this guy shows up at Kinsey’s office, asking her to deliver a very expensive cashier’s check. The guy turns up dead in the bay a couple of days later, and Kinsey is hired by his daughter to find the killer. The thread runs through San Luis Obispo, the men’s penitentiary the dead guy was in before being released, the families of those that died in a car crash, and a hooker from Los Angeles.

Kinsey is like a female Sam Spade or Philip Marlowe. The series starts in the early 80’s, so she doesn’t have a lot in the way of Internet searches and/or computer spreadsheets to use. Her major tools are her VW bug that’s mostly rust, her typewriter, and a stack of index cards with a cork board.

I highly recommend the series – it’s one of my favorites, and an era will come to an end when Grafton finally reaches ‘Z is for Zenith’ (you heard it here first, folks). Start with A is for Alibi. If you’re like me, you’ll read it in a couple of days. It’s candyfloss; it’s enjoyable while reading, but it doesn’t stick with you afterward.

Actually, knowing how I usually handle candyfloss, maybe candyfloss isn’t the most apt of metaphors… *shrugs* oh well. You get my drift.

Grade for D is for Deadbeat: 2.5 stars

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